Lighting Issues In Bathrooms



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Some people use dimmer switches throughout the house. Others pick and choose specifically where they think they’ll get the most benefit from varying light levels.

For me, one of those places is the bathroom. Particularly, the master bathroom. Here’s why…

Natural Light In Bathrooms

While there are certainly times when you’d want “all the light in the world” shining into your bathroom (say, when you’re getting ready & utilizing the sink and mirror area), my hope would be for more natural light, rather than bright lights from bulbs in those instances.

Of course, that’s largely determined by the overall design of your bathroom (including the number of windows, as well as their sizes and placement) than anything else. That, plus the direction that your house faces — which determines which hours of the day you have the most natural light flowing into any given room.

But when it comes to nighttime lighting, or what I call “mood lighting”… I like to be in full control of the amount of light in the room. For you, this may be true for the bathroom, or most any other room of the house.

Using Dimmer Switches To Create Mood Lighting

The fact of the matter is, the brightest light in the world is not always the most desired, or the most practical.

It is in those cases that I am thankful for dimmer switches. Plus, I love to create “mood lighting” all throughout the house practically every night of the week.

I rarely enjoy a harsh bright light — you know, the type that comes from most light fixtures. Instead, I prefer a softer glow — just enough to see clearly.

What Is Mood Lighting?

Think of a spotlight… just the right amount of light that calls attention to one particular area or object.

Also think: candlelight… light that is soft and warm, not harsh and overpowering.

I like to use dimmers to create the effect of spotlights and candle lights, combined. Especially when the dimmer is on recessed lighting, canned lights, or spotlights (…all of which are quite common inside log homes).

By shining just the right amount of “mood lighting” into a room or onto an object, the space feels so much more comfortable. Don’t you think?

Exterior “Mood Lighting”

That’s partly why people use spotlights to create “mood lighting” for the exterior of the home by casting a soft light on trees, attractive landscaping, or even certain parts of the house itself.

It makes your home look more inviting and sends a warm welcome feeling to those who pass by your home.

Are There Dimmers In Your Future?

There are certainly times when brighter lights might be technically better, if not more practical in any room of the house.

And yes, there are times when you need bright light in a bathroom — like at night, or when you’re “getting ready”.

But, more times than not, I prefer a much lower wattage than most people in general, and in all rooms — including the bathroom.

For example, who wants a long, luxurious soak in the bathtub under cold bright lights???

I guess I’m just not a fan of overly lit places — anywhere. Such is why dimmers are in the works for our new log home… especially in the master bathroom!

Lynnette

We've gone through the entire process of designing and planning every single detail of our dream log home! We have the blueprints... and the land... and the contractor... and the goal for our log cabin home to be our retirement home. Before you build (or buy) a log home, I have a slew of helpful tips for you -- to plan, design, build, decorate, and maintain your very own rustic modern log home. When I'm not fine-tuning the log home of my dreams, you'll find me at the corner of Good News & Fun Times as publisher of The Fun Times Guide (32 fun & helpful websites). To date, I’ve written nearly 300 articles for current and future log home owners on this site! Many of them have over 50K shares.

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